Vaccination Programmes

Tetanus

Tetanus is a potentially fatal disease of animals which we are able to vaccinate against. 

Horses are particularly susceptible to Tetanus, and its spores are everywhere in the environment, meaning horses with wounds, cuts or any other injuries are easily exposed. Signs include convulsions and serious neurological signs such as extension of the legs and pulled back lips. Most infected horses die as it is a very hard disease to treat.
Luckily the vaccine is readily available, very effective (is also well tolerated), and with a completed programme (2 doses 4 weeks apart, followed by an annual booster, there is strong immunity.
 
For all horses with unknown or lapsed vaccination history and young foals the vaccination schedule is:
– 2 vaccinations, 4 weeks apart (from 3 months of age), with a booster (third) vaccination given 12 months after the second vaccination.
– Boosters after that are given every 3-5 years – the vaccine is proven to have good, long lasting immunity.
 
For broodmares, a booster vaccination is given 4-6 weeks prior to foaling to provide the foal immunity through the colostrum.
 

Strangles

Strangles is a bacterial disease which is highly contagious and can spread amongst horses rapidly. It causes infections and abscesses in the lymph nodes around the head and neck, which can cause issues breathing – hence the name ‘strangles’.

If caught early enough it is usually treatable.

For all horses with unknown or lapsed vaccination history and young foals the vaccination schedule is:
– 3 vaccinations, 2 weeks apart (from 3 months of age).
– Boosters after that are given every 12 months.
 
For broodmares, a booster vaccination is given 4-6 weeks prior to foaling to provide the foal immunity through the colostrum. This can be combined with tetanus vaccination.
 

Equine Herpes Virus (EHV)

This is a group of virus strains that can have various effects on horses, but most notably respiratory and reproductive effects.

Vaccination is important to prevent the disease caused by EHV, and reducing the risk of abortion caused by EHV1.

  • For pregnant mares, vaccinations are given during the fifth, seventh and ninth months of each pregnancy.
  • For young horses to aid in the prevention of EHV-1 respiratory infections, a vaccine is given after weaning, followed by a second vaccine three to four weeks later. They are given another vaccine six months after the second primary dose and annually thereafter.
 
Contact the clinic today and discuss how we can tailor your horses vaccination programme to suit your needs.

Follow our clinic on social media

Follow our clinic on social media, get exclusive offers and deals.

Contact us!

About Us

Local farmers, associated rural communities and Te Puke town people have supported Te Puke Vet Centre for over 50 years. During those years scores of receptionists, nurses and vets have lived and enjoyed the benefits of this great town and area. It is very important for Te Puke Vets that we are strongly integrated with the local community and as part of that we are proud to support many local schools, sports clubs, service organisations and community events.